Beeyards & Batches

Beeyards

We believe that colony health is stronger when the honey bees can collect nectar and pollen from a variety of plants, shrubs and trees, and that the honey they produce from this diverse forage has more complex flavours. We take special care to select pasture and grasslands that have a wide variety and abundance of quality food sources throughout the growing season.

We work closely with the land owners to understand what grows in the area. Where possible, we locate the beeyards away from areas of mono-culture, where the lack of flower diversity creates a lack of food for honey bees.

We have six beeyards located near Crossfield, Airdrie, Symons Valley, Springbank and Lochend Lake. In addition, we have an urban hive located in Calgary and Crossfield.


Batches

This year we began providing batch numbers on our packaged honey, which connects you to the beeyard where the honey was produced, the types of forage in the area, and the date we harvested the honey comb. As each beeyard has unique forage throughout the growing seasons, the flavour profiles of the honey varies (like varieties of wine). We are exited to share the different honey harvests with you!


Batch Numbers

1901 Millarville Yard, July 20 harvest: An early Summer harvest from this yard in the Millarville area that is set near a wetland. There is some cultivated hayland in this area and the forage is a combination wildflowers and some alfalfa giving this honey its unique flavour compared to our northern yards.

1902 Crossfield Main Yard, August 29 harvest: A Summer Harvest honey from a forage mix of dandelion, sanfoin, alfalfa and alsike clover. The honey bees may also forage on canola growing in the region.

1903 Symons Valley, July 20 harvest: An early summer harvest from this beeyard located near Nose Creek in an area with both native and farmed land. Immediately surrounding the yard are Alberta wildflowers such as wild rose, shrubby cinquefoil, and wild bergamot. Willow along Nose Creek provide an important pollen source to the colonies in the spring.

1904 Airdrie, August 30 harvest: A Summer Harvest from this yard north of Airdrie is a forage mix of dandelion, sanfoin, alfalfa and milk vetch. The honey bees may have also foraged on canola growing within 3 km of this yard.

1905 Crossfield Main Yard, August 22 harvest: A Summer Harvest honey from a forage mix of dandelion, sanfoin, alfalfa and alsike clover. The honey bees also forage on canola growing in the region.

1906 Town of Crossfield, August 22 harvest: This Summer Harvest honey is from a strong colony in the town of Crossfield that has diverse forage of raspberry, crabapple, and various garden and crop flowers. With its wide forage profile, this honey has a wonderful and unique flavour relative to our other harvests.

1907 Symons Valley, August 22 Summer harvest: This beeyard is located near Nose Creek in an area with both native and farmed land. Immediately surrounding the yard are Alberta wildflowers such as wild rose, shrubby cinquefoil, and wild bergamot. Golden rod, sweet clover and thistle are also found near this yard.

1908 Crossfield Main Yard, July 22 early summer harvest: A pale Summer Harvest honey based on a forage mix of dandelion, sanfoin, alfalfa, milk vetch and alsike clover.

1909 Springbank Yard, July 27 harvest: An early Summer Harvest from this yard on the south bank of the Bow River. There is little cultivated crops in this area and the forage is a combination wildflowers and some alfalfa several kilometres south of this yard gives this honey its unique flavour compared to our northern yards.

1910 Crossfield Main Yard, August 29 harvest: A late summer harvest honey from a forage mix of sanfoin, alfalfa and clover. The honey bees also forage on canola growing in the region.

1911/1912 Crossfield Main Yard, July 22 early summer harvest: A pale Summer Harvest honey based on a forage mix of dandelion, sanfoin, alfalfa, milk vetch and alsike clover.

1920 Crossfield (3 Yards), August 10 harvest: An early Harvest honey that is a blend of dandelion, alfalfa and Sanfoin creating a soft floral honey. This year has been challenging for production. Although the forage is plentiful due to the rain in the spring and early summer, bees don’t venture out on cool and rainy days.